Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine & Mesothelioma Treatment

A doctor of osteopathic medicine is a licensed physician like other medical doctors. They can prescribe medication, perform surgeries and specialize in any area of medicine. But, they offer a uniquely holistic approach to patient care. This can benefit patients with mesothelioma.

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This page features: 11 cited research articles

Doctors of osteopathic medicine aim to treat the whole person, not just the illness or injury. They focus on preventative medicine and use osteopathic manipulative medicine.

Osteopathic manipulative medicine aims to improve the health of the musculoskeletal system. This system is the body’s interconnected network of muscles, nerves and bones. Osteopaths are trained to use their hands to diagnose and treat injury and illness within the musculoskeletal system.

Osteopaths try to empower patients with medical information. They educate patients on ways to prevent injury and illness. They teach patients how to take better care of their overall health.

Osteopathic physicians help people with mesothelioma manage their health. They help treat cancer symptoms and treatment side effects. Patients who experience nerve, muscle or bone pain may particularly benefit from osteopathic health care.

What Is a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine?

A doctor of osteopathic medicine receives training at an osteopathic school. They go through the same internship and residency process as medical doctors.

Osteopathic medicine was pioneered by Andrew Still in the late 1800s. Still was a medical doctor who was concerned about the overuse of potentially harmful medication.

Dr. Still was also concerned about the direction that traditional medicine was taking. After the U.S. Civil War, many popular medicines in use had toxic effects on patients. Dr. Still began to emphasize the importance of preventative medicine and the health of the whole person, not just treating disease.

Osteopathic medicine is similar to palliative care in that both disciplines aim to control symptoms and improve patient quality of life.

What is osteopathic medicine?
Osteopathic medicine focuses on preventative medicine, musculoskeletal health and limited use of prescription drugs.
What kind of doctor is a D.O.?
D.O. stands for “osteopathic doctor.” About 56 percent of D.O.s practice in primary specialties such as family medicine, pediatric medicine, internal medicine and osteopathic manipulative medicine. A handful have become mesothelioma specialists in fields such as medical oncology or thoracic surgery.
What is a D.O. in medical terms?
D.O.s practice osteopathic medicine, while M.D.s practice allopathic medicine. Allopathic medicine involves the treatment of disease by conventional means. Osteopathic medicine is different — it integrates preventative medicine, uses fewer prescription drugs and applies osteopathic manipulative techniques.

Need Help Finding a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Near You?

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Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine vs. Medical Doctor

There are two kinds of physicians in America: Medical doctors and osteopathic doctors. A doctor of osteopathic medicine goes through the same kind of training as other medical doctors. But they must also complete 200 hours of additional training in osteopathic manipulative medicine.

  • Osteopaths get their medical degree from a U.S. osteopathic school. They are accredited by the American Osteopathic Associate Commission, which is within the Osteopathic College Accreditation.

  • Medical doctors get their degree from schools accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education.

Both kinds of doctors attend four years of medical school and complete internships and residencies. Both are licensed by the same state licensing boards. This means they both must meet the same requirements to practice medicine.

Is an osteopath a real doctor?
Yes, an osteopath is a real doctor. They are licensed and board-certified doctors, just like M.D.s.
What is the difference between M.D. and D.O.?
The primary difference between M.D.s and D.O.s is that D.O.s are trained in osteopathic manipulative medicine. D.O.s tend to prescribe fewer medications, and they teach patients about preventative medicine. D.O.s use osteojapathic manipulation to diagnose and treat musculoskeletal issues.

Top Qualities of an Osteopathic Doctor

Patients should look for the following qualities in an osteopathic doctor.

  • Good communication skills
  • Compassionate interaction with patients
  • Patience in explaining medical care
  • Gentle touch when applying osteopathic manipulative medicine
  • Involvement in community care or educating future osteopaths

Top Osteopathic Doctors for Mesothelioma

The following doctors of osteopathic medicine have experience treating people with mesothelioma.

Dr. Hossein Borghaei, Chief, Thoracic Medical Oncology

Hossein Borghaei

Fox Chase Cancer Center

Get in touch

Shanel Bhagwandin

Jupiter Medical Center

Get in touch
Dr. Robert Ramirez, Medical Oncologist

Robert Ramirez

Ochsner Medical Center

Get in touch

People with mesothelioma can use online search tools to find osteopaths near where they live.

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Last Modified November 14, 2018

Writer

Joining the team in February 2008 as a writer and editor, Michelle Whitmer has translated medical jargon into patient-friendly information at Asbestos.com for more than eight years. Michelle is a registered yoga teacher, a member of the Academy of Integrative Health & Medicine, and was quoted by The New York Times on the risks of asbestos exposure.

Walter Pacheco, Managing Editor at Asbestos.com
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5 Cited Article Sources

  1. Indiana University Bloomington. (n.d.). Two Kinds of Physicians: Allopathic and Osteopathic.
    Retrieved from: http://www.hpplc.indiana.edu/medicine/med-res-twokinds.shtml
  2. Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. (n.d.). What is Osteopathic Medicine?
    Retrieved from: https://www.pcom.edu/about/what-is-osteopathic-medicine.html
  3. UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine. (2017, April 26). DO vs. MD: What’s the difference?
    Retrieved from: http://medschool.ucla.edu/body.cfm?id=1158&action=detail&ref=1019
  4. American Osteopathic Association. (n.d.). About DOs.
    Retrieved from: http://www.osteopathic.org/osteopathic-health/about-dos/Pages/default.aspx
  5. American Osteopathic Association. (n.d.). What is a DO? Retrieved from: http://www.osteopathic.org/osteopathic-health/about-dos/what-is-a-do/Pages/default.aspx
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